Scholarships Available!

Social Work Direct Scholarship (Deadline April 11)

Eligibility Requirements:

  1. Formal acceptance into the Social Work program
  2. Cumulative 3.0 GPA
  3. Enrollment in a minimum of 5 credit hours the following academic year

Submission Requirements:

  1. An essay describing your purpose in applying for this scholarship, including future plans and why you chose Social Work as a profession
  2. Two personal references
  3. A written thank you for letter for the scholarship

Social Work Professional Involvement Scholarship (Deadline March 14)

Eligibility Requirements:

  1. Student must be a declared Social Work major
  2. Current membership in NASW with proof of active participation
  3. Proof of active participation in the Social Work Club
  4. Proof of other community involvement

Submission Requirements:

  1. An essay (250-500 words) addressing the eligibility criteria outlined above
  2. Three references

 

 2015-2016 Student Learning Outcomes

Curriculum

The Professional Foundation Areas

Social workers must demonstrate proficiency and competence in nine professional areas:  Professional Values and Ethics, Diversity, Populations at Risk, Social and Economic Justice, Human Behavior in the Social Environment, Social Welfare Policy and Services, Social Work Practice, Research, and Field Practicum.

  1. Professional Values and EthicsThe BSW has an integral relationship to social work purposes and to the fundamental values, knowledge, and skills of social work.  The Code of Ethics guides all practice for professional social workers.  Values include the rights of self determination, the dignity and worth of all humans, the uniqueness of individuals, and the rights to resource opportunities.  These concepts are infused throughout the entire curriculum.
  2. DiversityThe social work profession, by virtue of its system of ethics, its traditional value commitments, and its long history of work in the whole range of human services, is committed to preparing students to understand and appreciate cultural and social diversity.  Differences and similarities in the experiences, needs, and belief of people is infused throughout all courses and experiences.
  3. Special PopulationsThe social work program provides content related to oppression and to the experiences, needs, and responses of people who have been subjected to institutionalized forms of oppression.  It also specifically provides content on ethnic minorities of color and women.  Content is infused throughout the curriculum.
  4. Social and Economic JusticeStudents develop an understanding of the dynamics and consequences of economic injustice, including all forms of human oppression and discrimination.  Theory and practice content presents strategies for achieving social and economic justice and combating cause and effects of oppression.
  5. Human Behavior in the Social EnvironmentIn keeping with social work’s person-in-environment focus, students need knowledge of  individuals as they develop over the life span and have membership in families, groups, organizations, and communities; students need knowledge of the relationships among human biological, social psychological, and cultural systems as they affect and are affected by human behavior. Classes required to meet these needs include:  General Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Sociology, Social Problems, and Human Biology.  The Human Behavior and the Social Environment course integrates these concepts.
  6. Social Welfare Policy and ServicesThe major aims of study in this area are to prepare professionals to function as informed and competent practitioners in providing services and as knowledgeable and committed participants in efforts to achieve change in social policies and programs.  Students are expected to develop skills in the use and application of scientific knowledge to the analysis and development of social welfare policy and services.  They should know the structure of service programs and the history of the organized profession and other social welfare institutions.  Social work means to advance the achievement of social work goals and purposes. Courses in the sequence include:  Introduction to Social Work, Social Welfare Policy I, and Social Welfare Policy II.
  7. Social Work PracticeSocial work practice embraces multiple methods and models, including generalist practice and a variety of concentrations.  Social work practice occurs with individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities.  The curriculum content relating to practice must include knowledge base and practice skills.  The practice skills taught for use in any practice context and with any size system must reflect an integration of professional purposes, knowledge, and values. A prerequisite to all practice classes is Interviewing Skills.  Three practice classes are offered including:  Practice I : Individual, Practice II: Groups and Family, and Practice III: Community Organization and Social Change.
  8. ResearchInformed criticism and a spirit of inquiry are the basis of scientific thinking and of systematic approaches to the acquisition of knowledge and the application of it to practice.  The content on research should impart scientific methods of building knowledge for practice and of evaluating service delivery in all areas of practice. Social Research is offered in the junior year.  Research methods are infused throughout all social work courses.
  9. Field PracticumThe field practicum is an integral part of the curriculum in social work education.  It engages the student in supervised direct service activities, providing practical experience in the application of the theory and skills acquired in all the foundation areas.  The objective of the practicum is to produce a professionally reflective, self-evaluating, knowledgeable, and developing social worker. The practicum is during both semesters of the senior year or in a summer block.  Students begin to prepare for generalist practice by integration of knowledge and skills in this agency experience.  Seminars are provided at both levels to promote self-awareness as well as integration of theory and practice.
Course Descriptions

SW111 Social Work Project

1 credit

This course is an expansion of Introduction to Social Work. We will explore the various services, activities and responsibilities of social workers. This course is also to serve as an introduction to the skills of reviewing the literature in research.

 

SW203 Corrections

3 credits

An historical survey of the American correctional system. The evolution, philosophy, and methods of corrections will be explored. This course may be taken as an elective or as part of the Criminal Justice minor.

 

SW213 Crime in America

3 credits

This course explores the nature of crime in America, the theories of crime causation, the theories of victims and victimization, types of crimes committed, and recommended interventions to decrease crime.

 

SW221 Chemical Dependency

1 credit

This course will confront the issues related to substance abuse. It will provide a broad introduction to the enormity and scope of this problem. The student should develop a basic understanding of the nature of substance abuse and be aware of treatment modalities available.

 

SW222 Independent Study: Variable Topics (Arranged)

1-4 credits

Independent study courses provide the opportunity to accommodate different topics, learning experiences, and training opportunities which occasionally arise in the social work field.

 

SW223 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits

This course is designed to expose students to the criminal justice system in America. The study of criminal justice is truly an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. Under the umbrella of criminal justice the law is studied to examine aspects of criminal law and procedure, and sociology is reviewed to examine the structure of social institutions and how they affect the administration of justice. The field of criminal justice also includes influences from other disciplines including history, anthropology, and psychology, as well as public administration.

 

SW231 Social Work: Variable Topics

1-4 credits

These topical courses study particular areas of social work, or topics which reflect the current interest of the student population.

 

SW233 Social Welfare Policy I

3 credits

This course examines the historical development of social welfare, as well as current policies and issues facing social workers in the early 21st century. Social work values and assumptions are integrated by the participants as the process of policy making and social change throughout history are discussed. Prerequisite: SO103 and SO273/SW273, or permission of instructor.

 

SW243 Interviewing Skills

3 credits

This course is designed to introduce and practice the basic listening and interviewing skills that are needed in the helping interview and the delivery of human services. All areas of communication skills will be reviewed and applied to the social work setting. Special emphasis is also placed on working with women and people of color.

 

SW251/SO251 Rainman

1 credit

This course offers students the opportunity to gain further self-awareness, knowledge and understanding of themselves in regard to personal values and relationships. Focus is on themes such as changes in personality, responsibility in relationships, and the development of values, trust and intimacy.

 

SW253 Counseling Theory

3 credits

This course introduces the basic counseling theories. Critical evaluation of each theory and application to social work and counseling practice is integrated. The student will learn the key concepts, philosophy and assumptions, the therapeutic goals, contributions and limitations, and application to each theory. Prerequisite: SW243 or permission of instructor.

 

SW263 Child and Family Welfare

3 credits

This course will briefly outline the dynamics of several of the problems/dysfunctions of the American family today including domestic violence, substance abuse, and alternative placement for children. Discussed will be the public family welfare system, intervention techniques, the law in regard to issues of the family and services available to victims and others involved in family situations that may cause difficulty. Ideas for prevention of future problems will also be discussed.

 

SW271/SO271 Crisis Intervention

1 credit

This course is designed as an introduction to the identification, prevention, and intervention in crisis situation. It seeks to provide the student with the basic perspective for assessing and intervening in the crisis situation as it is presented in a variety of diverse cultural groups and problem situations. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of community services responsible for crisis intervention in the local area.

 

SW273/SO273 Introduction to Social Work

3 credits

This course is an introduction to the profession of social work. An understanding of the historical development of the profession, the effects of society on social welfare and, specifically, the philosophy and values of social work will be learned. The generalist perspective of social work is stressed in preparation for BSW education and practice. Specific fields and services of social work, as well as career opportunities, will be examined and explored. (Cultural Diversity course)

 

SW293 Gerontology

3 credits

This course explores the social, psychological and biological changes which occur in individuals from middle age to death. Students will explore social policies about aging and review ideas about aging across cultures.

 

SW300 Social Work: Variable Topics

1-4 credits

These topical courses study particular areas of social work, or topics which reflect the current interest of the student population.

 

SW303 Death and Dying

3 credits

A comprehensive introduction to the study of death, dying, and grief by presenting the salient points of major issues and questions through diverse points of view. Discusses solid theoretical background of grief throughout the lifespan.

 

SW311 Counseling Ethics

1 credit

An overview of ethics and legal issues as they relate to the practice of counseling and client/counselor relationships. Discussed are ethical standards for counselors, client rights, legal implications and quality client care. Prerequisites: SO233, SO243 and SW243, or permission of instructor.

 

SW323/SO333 Institutional Racism/Sexism

3 credits

This course examines the problems and issues of institutional racism and sexism as it relates to social injustice. The focus is on the causes of institutional racism and sexism,its effects on the individual, families, and groups, and on the structure and decision-making process in private, corporate, and governmental institutions. Discussion will be directed at increasing the awareness and appreciation of the issues and problems that institutional racism/sexism and dehumanizing biases have had on different groups in the United States of America — especially the Blacks, Asians, Native Americans, Hispanics, women, individuals with physical and mental disabilities, and homosexuals. Consideration will be given to the role of social work practice in helping eradicate these institutional barriers and developing multicultural competences along with skills in interpersonal relations and group facilitation in order to impact people we are working with as clients or as students. Prerequisite: SO103 or permission of instructor.

 

SW324/PS324 Human Behavior in the Social Environment

4 credits

This course is a study of the contributions of behavioral and social sciences to a systems perspective of human relationships. It is designed to assist a student in developing an understanding of human behavior across the lifespan. Prerequisite: PS133.

 

SW334 Independent Study

1-4 credits

This course offers opportunities for independent study and research of specific topics of individual interest. The student, together with the assigned faculty, will develop a learning contract that includes learning goals and objectives, learning activities, and evaluation.

 

SW353/SO353 Social Problems

3 credits

This course is a critical analysis of social problems and social justice. Issues discussed include problems of youth, crime, substance abuse and addictions, civil disobedience and civil disorder, prejudice and oppression of minority groups, and disadvantaged groups. The course promotes solutions through analysis of linkages and tradeoffs at a micro-, macro-, and mega-level of society. Prerequisite: SO103. (Social Science/Human Culture Core course) (Cultural Diversity course)

 

SW356 Juvenile Delinquency

3 credits

Examines the characteristics of delinquents, the causes of juvenile delinquency, methods of correction and the juvenile justice system.

 

SW363 Social Work Research

3 credits

This course is an introduction to the principles and variations of the scientific research methods for generalist social work. It will provide the students with the knowledge and skills to understand and conduct research using different methods such as survey, group and single system designs; as well as practice and program evaluations. Implications of human diversity and ethical issues will be stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: acceptance into the program or expressed exception by social work faculty.

 

SW374 Social Work Practice I: Individual

4 credits

The first of two courses in generalist practice, this course teaches the basic processes and practice of social work. The student learns how to integrate the knowledge, values, and skills learned in other social work courses as well as master the problem solving process from a creative generalist’s theoretical base. Prerequisite: acceptance into Social Work program or permission of Social Work Department Chair.

 

SW383 Social Work Practice II: Groups and Family

3 credits

The second of two courses in generalist practice, this course will teach the student about the theory of group development and group dynamics, as well as family dynamics and systems. It will have special emphasis on group dynamics such as group facilitation, group problem-solving, goal setting, structuring a group, and the purpose, advantage and disadvantage of groups. It will be experiential in that the class will be handled in a group setting. Family systems, family meetings and guidelines to facilitating family sessions will be addressed. Prerequisite: SW374 or permission of Social Work Department Chair.

 

SW411 Social Work Special Topics

1-4 credits

This course is an in-depth examination of a specific topic in social work. It is offered as needed and reflects the interest of the current student population and/or current events in the field of social work.

 

SW415 Field Practicum I

5 credits

This course introduces the social work program senior to the actual practice of generalist social work in an agency setting. Students are provided with an opportunity to apply social work knowledge, skills and values learned in the classroom to the needs and environment of the client population served. Prerequisite: SW374, SW383, SW452 and SW454.

 

SW423/SO423 Families Today

3 credits

This course is an empirical examination of family organization in historical and cross cultural perspectives with special emphasis on the modern nuclear families. The goal of the course is to examine current concerns about the family in a larger context and analyze public policy as it relates to the family. Discussed will be the life cycle of the family, adjustments at each stage of development, the influences of race and socioeconomic status, as well as other current issues. Prerequisite: SO103.

 

SW425 Field Practicum II

5 credits

This course continues to build on the practice of generalist social work in an agency setting initiated during SW415. Students are expected to increase their application of social work knowledge, skills and values learned in the classroom to the needs and environment of the client population served by the field agency. This should include increased workload responsibilities, as well as refinement of practice skills. Prerequisite: successful completion of SW415.

 

SW452 Community Practice and Policy I

2 credits

This is a macro-level social work practice course which addresses the issue of management and organization of social agencies, assessment of community need, community based advocacy and social change. Students will review theories, models and processes involved in creating effective and planned social change in an effort to promote social justice as a generalist practitioner. This class prepares students to effectively close service gaps through policy analysis, formulation and implementation, as well as legislative advocacy. Policy practice that relates to women, people of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds and other oppressed groups will be studied from an advocacy and service perspective.

 

SW454 Community Practice and Policy II

4 credits

This is a continuation of SW452. It is a macro-level social work practice course which addresses the issue of management and organization of social agencies, assessment of community need, community based advocacy and social change. Students will review theories, models and processes involved in creating effective and planned social change in an effort to promote social justice as a generalist practitioner. This class prepares students to effectively close service gaps through policy analysis, formulation and implementation, as well as legislative advocacy. Policy practice that relates to women, people of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds and other oppressed groups will be studied from an advocacy and service perspective.