Course Descriptions

NURSING – TRADITIONAL BSN

NB213 Introduction to Professional Nursing

3 credits

This beginning course introduces the student to the discipline and profession of nursing, the department of nursing’s philosophy and conceptual framework, program outcomes, the nursing process and the BSN roles. The caring philosophy, historical, spiritual and cultural considerations, nursing theories, professionalism, leadership and legal/ethical aspects of safe nursing practice are introduced. A variety of teaching strategies are used to introduce the student to the primary domains of the program: ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH and NURSING, as well as the secondary themes identified as essential to the role and function of the professional nurse: health care, safety, quality improvement, social justice, diversity, caring, nursing process, BSN roles and nursing informatics. Effective communication techniques, teaching/learning principles and math skills are studied and practiced. Prerequisite: admission to 200-level nursing, EN113, MA153 and PS133. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Lab: 1.5 hours/week.

 

NB235 Fundamentals of Nursing and Care of the Older Adult

5 credits

This course provides the theoretical and practical basis for fundamental nursing skills. Basic needs of the individual, with focus on the older adult, are examined. The nursing process is used to identify and address the bio-psycho-social, developmental, cultural, and spiritual needs of individuals. The impact of the primary themes of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING care of individuals is expanded as a basis of nursing care. In addition, the following secondary themes are continued to be identified asessential to the role and function of the professional nurse: health care, safety, quality improvement, social justice, diversity, caring, nursing process, BSN roles and nursing informatics. Ethical and legal aspects of safe nursing practice are explored as the student gains knowledge and experience in the profession. Students apply the theory of this course through clinical experiences in long-term care. Prerequisite: NB213, NB243 and PS153. Classroom: 3 hours; Clinical: 90 hours/semester.

 

NB301 Death and Dying

1 credit

This course provides an introduction to the study of death, dying, and grief by presenting the salient points of major issues and questions through diverse points of view.

 

NB303 Pathophysiology

3 credits

This foundation course focuses on adaptive and maladaptive human responses to disruptions in normal physiology. The primary themes of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING are integrated throughout this course. The student will use knowledge of anatomy/physiology, chemistry, and microbiology as a basis for exploring and expanding how alterations in structure and function disrupt human body adaptation (maladaptation). Pathophysiology of disease is studied with emphasis on developing scientific rationale for nursing practice. Prerequisite: BI173/BL171, BI183/BL181, “C” or above in BI263/BL263, CH133/CL131 or equivalent, and NB243. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NB311 Therapeutic Nutrition

1 credit

This course will provide the student with an overview of nutritional therapy for diabetes, cardiac, renal, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. Practical applications and treatment of nutrition-related pathologies will be emphasized. Basic knowledge will be introduced to enable students to begin to evaluate nutritional issues and apply therapeutic nutrition principles to client care through the nursing process. Prerequisite: 200-level nursing courses and 200-level science requirements or approval of instructor. Classroom: 1 hour.

 

NB323 Applied Drug Therapy

3 credits

This course focuses on the relationship between drug therapy and its impact on patients in the context of ENVIRONMENT,

HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING. The nursing process is the framework from which the various classifications of drugs are discussed. Pharmacokinetics, side effects, patient response, evidence based practice, and nursing care for each drug are explored. The course enables students to make therapeutic assessments and nursing judgments regarding drug therapy for patient care. The collaborative role in pharmacology is discussed. Prerequisite: CH133/CL131 or equivalent, NB235 and NB303; Corequisite: NB311. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NB333 Health Assessment

3 credits

This course focuses on the holistic health assessment of individuals of all ages. The functional patterns are the framework for assessment and documentation of the holistic assessment. Inherent in this course is the integration of ENVIRONMENT and HEALTH in the completion of the nursing assessment of HUMANITY. Assessment is the foundation upon which NURSING practices. Data analysis and critical thinking are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: admission to the major. Corequisite: NB213. Classroom: 2 hours; Lab: 3 hours/week.

 

NB338 Maternal-Child Nursing

8 credits

This course focuses on concepts pertaining to the health needs of women, children, and child-bearing families in multiple health care settings are presented in the context of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING. Promotion and maintenance of health for individuals of childbearing and childbearing families are primary focus. Principles of growth, development, and mental health are integrated. Developmental needs are considered utilizing selected theorists and prioritized according to Maslow. Nursing care of at-risk families and children with special needs is introduced. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to apply the nursing process in the care of the childbearing/childrearing client. Prerequisite: NB235 and NB303. Classroom: 4 hours; Clinical: 180 hours/semester.

 

NB344 Mental Health Nursing

4 credits

This course examines the development and changing focus of mental health nursing throughout the lifespan. The course is focused on the concepts basic to providing mental health care and meeting the mental health needs of clients along the HEALTH continuum. NURSING theory, DSM-V multi-axial evaluation system, psychobiology, psychopharmacology, the causations of mental illness, and the HUMANITY of the mind/body/spirit connection will be emphasized. The impact of the ENVIRONMENT on the health and wellbeing of individuals with psychiatric disorders will be addressed through the nursing process. Students are challenged to examine their roles as baccalaureate level nurses in providing health care services to persons affected by mental illness. A variety of teaching strategies are used to synthesize the evidence-based practice to providing quality mental health care to diverse populations. Clinical experiences provide students to observe the nursing process applied in the acute (in-patient), rehabilitation, and community outpatient mental health settings. Prerequisite: NB323 and PS353. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Clinical: 68 hours/semester.

 

NB368 Adult Health Nursing I

8 credits

This medical-surgical course expands the fundamental principles of nursing and focuses on concepts relating to care of the adult in the acute care setting with commonly occurring medical-surgical problems. A priority of this course is on the use of the nursing process and developing competence in providing holistic care for clients with specific health care needs/problems. The themes of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING are incorporated into holistic care of clients with acute and chronic alterations in health during the clinical experience. An introduction to QSEN and health care bundling is provided. The focus of the clinical experience is caring and critical thinking in the application of the nursing process with ill adults in health care facilities Prerequisite: NB235 and NB303. Corequisite: NB323. Classroom: 4 hours; Clinical: 180 hours/semester.

 

NB421/422/423 Variable Topics in Nursing

1/2/3 credits

These elective courses are designed to acquaint the nursing student with current practices in health care. Classroom: 1-2 hours.

 

NB446 Community Health Nursing

6 credits

Concepts basic to meeting the health needs of HUMANITY, particularly individuals, families, groups, and communities of diverse cultural and social backgrounds in community and rural settings are presented. The impact of the ENVIRONMENT upon the community as the client, and the interrelationship of the HEALTH status of the individual and of the community is explored. Health promotion and disease/illness prevention, along with the principles of epidemiology are addressed. A variety of teaching strategies are used to synthesize the baccalaureate nursing roles and evidence-based practice to provide quality care for individuals, families, groups, and communities. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to apply the nursing process and the concepts of community health nursing for individuals, families, groups, and communities. Students will complete a service learning project in which they reflect on their service to the community in light of servant leadership. Prerequisite: NB311, NB323, NB338, NB344, NB368, and NB473. Classroom: 3 hours; Clinical: 135 hours/semester.

 

NB451/452/453 Internship

1/2/3 credits

This course will focus on application of theoretical and practical nursing skills in a hospital setting. The nursing process is utilized to identify and address the bio-psycho-social developmental, cultural, and spiritual needs of individuals and families. The impact of the primary themes of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING care of individuals and families are incorporated into nursing care. Ethical and legal aspects of safe nursing practice are implemented. ANA’s Code of Ethics, Nursing Social Policy Statement, and Scope and Standards of Practice will be utilized to provide quality, competent nursing care. Prerequisite: All 200- and 300-level nursing courses.

 

NB455 Adult Health Nursing II

5 credits

This course studies the role of the baccalaureate nurse in providing competent care of clients with complex, multi-system alterations in health, both physiological and psychosocial. The NURSING process is the basis for discussion of holistic care of individuals, families, groups, and communities (HUMANITY) in a variety of HEALTH care systems and organizations (ENVIRONMENT). Both theory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for the student to examine complex care concepts, incorporating the professional behaviors, knowledge, and critical thinking of the baccalaureate nurse. Prerequisite: all 300-level nursing courses. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Clinical: 113 hours/semester.

 

NB463 Independent Study

1-3 credits

This course offers individual study that addresses special needs and interests. Selected readings, observations, conferences, and projects could be selected. The course can be used by the transfer student who needs extra credits in nursing as a way to make up the deficiency or to earn credit for prior learning. It can be used by the student who wants to explore in depth a topic of special interest including clinical internships. The student and the faculty advisor develop course objectives together, depending upon the student’s needs. The course offers the option of 1-3 credits. The number of projects/credits to be attempted will be determined at the time of enrollment. Prerequisite: admission to the program.

 

NB465 Leadership Roles in Managing Client Care

5 credits

This course examines the leadership character and management roles of the baccalaureate nurse. The NURSING process is the basis for discussion of holistic care of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations (HUMANITY) in a variety of HEALTH care systems and organizations (ENVIRONMENTS). The leadership role of nursing includes discussion of organizational and systems leadership for client safety and quality care, the management of staff and care for groups of clients, and healthcare policy, finance, and regulatory environments. Critical analysis of the nursing literature is incorporated to support nursing practice and to examine the legal, ethical, moral, and technological aspects of professional nursing. Theory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to examine the aspects of leadership and management, incorporating the professional nurse. Clinical experience will be with preceptors and focus on leadership and management of client care. This must be the last nursing course in the BSN program. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Clinical: 112 hours/semester.

 

NB473 Research in Nursing

3 credits

Concepts related to the understanding of nursing research are presented. Integration of best evidence with clinical expertise is evaluated to understand the impact of nursing research in clinical practice. Discrimination of valid and non-valid research is discussed and challenged as a base to utilize best evidence in practice. Ethical standards and ethics in research are presented to support regulatory requirements, confidentiality in research collection, analysis, and dissemination, and patient privacy. A variety of teaching strategies are used to synthesize the baccalaureate nursing roles and evidence based practice to promote quality clinical practice and application of current nursing research trends to nursing practice. Prerequisite: “C” or above in MA243 or concurrent. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NURSING – BSN COMPLETION (RNs and LPNs)

NU311 Therapeutic Nutrition

1 credit

This course will provide the student with an overview of nutritional therapy for diabetes, cardiac, renal, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. Practical applications and treatment of nutrition-related pathologies will be emphasized. Basic knowledge will be introduced to enable students to begin to evaluate nutritional issues and apply therapeutic nutrition principles to client care through the nursing process. Prerequisite: 200-level nursing courses and 200-level science requirements or approval of instructor. Classroom: 1 hour.

 

NU313 Dimensions of Professional Nursing

3 credits

This course is designed to introduce the registered nurse and the licensed practical nurse to the baccalaureate program and the role of the professional nurse. It provides the student with an opportunity to explore a variety of issues in professional nursing, using the baccalaureate nursing roles as the organizational structure. The multiple roles of the baccalaureate prepared nurse are analyzed, and methods of application to professional practice are discussed. An overview of nursing and non-nursing theories and models are introduced. The major themes of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING are introduced. This course focuses on the application of the select concepts: quality assessment, political process, and professionalism. Previous learning will be validated during this course. Prerequisite: admission to program. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NU323 Applied Drug Therapy

3 credits

This course focuses on the relationship between drug therapy and its impact on patients in the context of ENVIRONMENT,

HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING. The nursing process is the framework from which the various classifications of drugs are discussed. Pharmacokinetics, side effects, patient response, evidence based practice, and nursing care for each drug are explored. The course enables students to make therapeutic assessments and nursing judgments regarding drug therapy for patient care. The collaborative role in pharmacology is discussed. Prerequisite: CH133/CL131 or equivalent, NB235 and NB303; Corequisite: NB311. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NU333 Health Assessment

3 credits

This course is an introduction to holistic health assessment of the client across the lifespan. The functional patterns are the framework for documenting the health history and physical assessment of systems. Inherent in this course is the integration of ENVIRONMENT and HEALTH within the assessment of HUMANITY. Assessment is the foundation upon which NURSING practices. Data analysis is an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: NU313 or consent of instructor. Classroom: 2 hours; Lab: 3 hours/week.

 

NU335 Maternal-Child Nursing

5 credits

Designed for the LPN diploma completion student, concepts pertaining to the health needs of women, children, and child-bearing families in multiple health care settings are presented in the context of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING. Promotion and maintenance of health for individuals of childbearing and childbearing families are primary focus. Principles of growth, development, and mental health are integrated. Developmental needs are considered utilizing selected theorists and prioritized according to Maslow. Nursing care of at-risk families and children with special needs is introduced. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to apply the nursing process in the care of the childbearing/childrearing client. Prerequisite: Successful challenge of NB213, NB235, NB303 via NLN ACE I and BNC I, NU313, NU333, NB243, and NU323 (or concurrent). Classroom: 3 credit hours; Clinical: 90 hours/semester.

 

NU344 Mental Health Nursing

4 credits

This course examines the development and changing focus of mental health nursing throughout the lifespan. The course is focused on the concepts basic to providing mental health care and meeting the mental health needs of clients along the HEALTH continuum. NURSING theory, DSM-V multi-axial evaluation system, psychobiology, psychopharmacology, the causations of mental illness, and the HUMANITY of the mind/body/spirit connection will be emphasized. The impact of the ENVIRONMENT on the health and wellbeing of individuals with psychiatric disorders will be addressed through the nursing process. Students are challenged to examine their roles as baccalaureate level nurses in providing health care services to persons affected by mental illness. A variety of teaching strategies are used to synthesize the evidence-based practice to providing quality mental health care to diverse populations. Clinical experiences provide students to observe the nursing process applied in the acute (in-patient), rehabilitation, and community outpatient mental health settings. Prerequisite: NU323 and PS353. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Clinical: 68 hours/semester.

 

NU373 Family as Client

3 credits

This course focuses on family HEALTH promotion and disease prevention. Theories and models are applied to family dynamics including the ENVIRONMENT, systems, culture, communication, family roles, family self-care (HUMANITY), family stress, rural life, and social support. The NURSING process is applied to family health promotion/protection in areas of nutrition, stress management, sleep, recreation, sexuality, positive health behaviors, and environmental health. The student will apply the principles of family nursing learned in theory to a family in the community. A variety of teaching strategies are employed to illustrate the effect of quality of care on well individuals and families and to incorporate various baccalaureate nursing roles and evidence-based practice into family nursing. Prerequisite: NU313 or consent of instructor. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NU375 Adult Health Nursing I

5 credits

Designed for the LPN diploma completion student, this medical-surgical course expands the fundamental principles of nursing experiences the LPN has acquired and focuses on concepts relating to care of the adult in the acute care setting with commonly occurring medical-surgical problems. A priority of this course is on the use of the nursing process and developing competence in providing holistic care for clients with specific health care needs/problems. The themes of ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, HEALTH, and NURSING are incorporated into holistic care of clients with acute and chronic alterations in health during the clinical experience. Focus of the clinical experience is caring and critical thinking in the application of the nursing process with ill adults in health care facilities. Prerequisite: NU313, NU333 and NU323 (or concurrent). Classroom: 3 hours; Clinical: 90 hours/semester.

 

NU436 Community Health Nursing

6 credits

Concepts basic to meeting the health needs HUMANITY, particularly individuals, families, groups, and communities of diverse cultural and social backgrounds in community and rural settings are presented. The impact of the ENVIRONMENT upon the community as the client, and the interrelationship of the HEALTH status of the individual and of the community is explored. Health promotion and disease/illness prevention, along with the principles of epidemiology are addressed. A variety of teaching strategies are used to synthesize the baccalaureate nursing roles and evidence based practice to provide quality care for individuals, families, groups, and communities. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to apply the nursing process and the concepts of community health nursing for individuals, families, groups, and communities. Prerequisite: all 300-level nursing courses, PS353 and NU473 (or corequisite). Classroom: 3 hours; Clinical: 135 hours/semester.

 

NU454 Leadership Roles in Nursing

4 credits

This course studies the leadership character and management roles of the baccalaureate nurse. The NURSING process is the basis for discussion of holistic care of individuals, families, groups, and communities (HUMANITY) in a variety of HEALTH care systems and organizations (ENVIRONMENTS). The leadership role of the nurse includes discussion of the management of staff and care for groups of clients. Critical analysis of the nursing literature is incorporated to examine legal, ethical, and moral aspects of professional nursing practice. Both theory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for the student to examine leadership/management skills, incorporating the attitudes, knowledge, and critical thinking of the baccalaureate nurse. Preparation for NCLEX is highlighted. Clinical experiences will be with mentors who have roles in leadership/management of staff and/or clients. Synthesis of these roles will be in preparation for graduation and graduate study. This must be the last nursing course in the BSN program. Classroom: 1.5 hours; Clinical: 112 hours/semester.

 

NU455 Adult Health Nursing II

5 credits

This course studies the role of the baccalaureate nurse in providing competent care of clients with complex, multi-system alterations in health, both physiological and psychosocial. The NURSING process is the basis for discussion of holistic care of individuals, families, groups, and communities (HUMANITY) in a variety of HEALTH care systems and organizations (ENVIRONMENT). Both theory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for the student to examine complex care concepts, incorporating the professional behaviors, knowledge, and critical thinking of the baccalaureate nurse. Prerequisite: all 300-level nursing courses. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Clinical: 113 hours/semester.

 

NU463 Independent Study

1-3 credits

This course offers individual study that addresses special needs and interests. Selected readings, observations, conferences, and projects could be selected. The course can be used by the transfer student who needs extra credits in nursing as a way to make up the deficiency or to earn credit for prior learning. It can be used by the student who wants to explore in depth a topic of special interest including clinical internships. The student and the faculty advisor develop course objectives together, depending upon the student’s needs. The course offers the option of 1-3 credits. The number of projects/credits to be attempted will be determined at the time of enrollment. Prerequisite: admission to the program.

 

NU465 Leadership Roles in Managing Client Care

5 credits

This course examines the leadership character and management roles of the baccalaureate nurse. The NURSING process is the basis for discussion of holistic care of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations (HUMANITY) in a variety of HEALTH care systems and organizations (ENVIRONMENTS). The leadership role of nursing includes discussion of organizational and systems leadership for client safety and quality care, the management of staff and care for groups of clients, and healthcare policy, finance, and regulatory environments. Critical analysis of the nursing literature is incorporated to support nursing practice and to examine the legal, ethical, moral, and technological aspects of professional nursing. Theory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to examine the aspects of leadership and management, incorporating the knowledge, attitudes, and critical thinking of the professional nurse. Clinical experience will be with preceptors and focus on leadership and management of client care. This must be the last nursing course in the BSN program. Classroom: 2.5 hours; Clinical: 112 hours/semester.

 

NU473 Nursing Research

3 credits

Concepts related to the understanding of nursing research are presented. Integration of best evidence with clinical expertise is evaluated to understand the impact of nursing research in clinical practice. Discrimination of valid and non-valid research is discussed and challenged as a base to utilize best evidence in practice. Ethical standards and ethics in research are presented to support regulatory requirements, confidentiality in research collection, analysis, and dissemination, and patient privacy. A variety of teaching strategies are used to synthesize the baccalaureate nursing roles and evidence based practice to promote quality clinical practice and application of current nursing research trends to nursing practice. Prerequisite: “C” or above in MA243 or concurrent; NU313 or concurrent. Classroom: 3 hours.

 

NUR454 Leadership Roles in Nursing

4 credits

This seminar course focuses on the nursing leadership character and management roles of the baccalaureate nurse. The nursing leadership/management role includes the management of groups of staff and the care of groups of clients. Both the theoretical and clinical components offer the student the opportunity to explore, synthesize, and evaluate baccalaureate roles, knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by the professional nurse for leadership and management. Group discussion will focus on clinical application in the areas of competence in professional practice, roles of the nurse in clinical practice, teaching, decision-making, peer review and performance evaluation in promotion of quality nursing care. As the discussions progress, the NURSING care will be synthesized in relationship to ENVIRONMENT, HUMANITY, and HEALTH. Clinical experiences will be with mentors who have roles in leadership/management of staff and/or clients. Synthesis of these roles will be in preparation for graduation and graduate study. This must be the last nursing course in the BSN completion program. Classroom: 2 hours; Clinical: 90 hours/semester.

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